Fluoride exposure among pregnant women in California

Water fluoridation has been cited as one of the dental field’s most successful interventions to improve dental health. Since 1945, when the United States implemented community water fluoridation, rates of cavities have declined. Also, providing fluoridated tap water to most residents, regardless of income, education, or socioeconomic status, can reduce disparities in dental health. Fluoride … Continue reading Fluoride exposure among pregnant women in California

So many chemicals—how do we decide which ones to study?

The question is no longer whether environmental chemical exposures produce adverse health effects in children, but rather which chemicals have the most harmful impact. Fetuses and children are especially susceptible to environmental influences. Scientists and physicians are concerned that over the last 10-30 years, the prevalence of certain childhood diseases has increased, including adverse birth … Continue reading So many chemicals—how do we decide which ones to study?

Bridging communities and science

La importancia de la intencionalidad al incluir poblaciones subrepresentadas en investigaciónes clínicas Las versiones de este post aparecen en español e inglés a continuación. The importance of intentionality when including underrepresented populations in clinical research Versions of this post appear in both spanish and english languages below. Coordinadores de estudios investigativos tienen un papel importante … Continue reading Bridging communities and science

PRHE at American Public Health Association Annual Meeting & Expo 2019

The Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment invites you to the following events at the American Public Health Association Annual Meeting & Expo 2019. November 2-6, 2019 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center Monday, November 4th Translating Environmental Health Sciences for Diverse Audiences to Protect Children’s Health Session 3354.0 Time: 3:00 - 4:30pm Location: 104B Protecting children’s … Continue reading PRHE at American Public Health Association Annual Meeting & Expo 2019

New flame retardants, old problems

Replacement flame retardants present serious risks, caution scientists New flame retardants escaping from our TVs and children’s car seats are just as toxic as the flame retardants they’re intended to replace, according to a peer-reviewed study published today in Environmental Science & Technology Letters. The authors found that the replacement chemicals, called organophosphate flame retardants, … Continue reading New flame retardants, old problems

Lights, camera, research! PRHE takes the spotlight on CNN

The scientific community usually disseminates research in peer reviewed journals, scientific magazines, and other academic literature. But sharing innovative research with a wider audience is also important – especially when it involves Emmy award-winning, CNN Chief Medical Correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta. In fall 2018, captivated by our work to understand how environmental exposures affect women … Continue reading Lights, camera, research! PRHE takes the spotlight on CNN

Don’t put pregnancy in a corner: it’s about more than fetal health

Many people know that developing fetuses are especially vulnerable to toxic chemicals — this is why during pregnancy doctors advise you not to eat fish high in mercury as it affects the fetus’ rapidly growing brain. But ask anyone who has been pregnant, and they’ll tell you their bodies also underwent radical changes. To better … Continue reading Don’t put pregnancy in a corner: it’s about more than fetal health

Paint strippers need informed solutions, not regrettable substitution

Methylene chloride is a chemical used in paint strippers that is bad for the environment and very toxic — it can even kill you. Methylene chloride is dangerous for workers and consumers and we need safer strippers- but my new research shows the dark side of making a substitution without a careful evaluation. My colleagues from … Continue reading Paint strippers need informed solutions, not regrettable substitution

What causes so much preterm birth in Fresno County?

Fresno County, in the San Joaquin Valley of California (CA) has significantly higher levels of preterm birth than the rest of California (12.1% compared to 9.6% in CA in 2012)—but why? Preterm birth happens when babies are born too soon, before 37 weeks gestation, and factors including environmental pollution may contribute. We wanted to understand … Continue reading What causes so much preterm birth in Fresno County?

Arsenic in drinking water may increase the risk of preterm birth

Preterm birth, when a baby is born before 37 weeks, is a pressing public health problem because babies born early have greater risks of mortality and health complications and later disease in child and adulthood. In 2017 alone, California had more than 400,000 preterm births an increased rate of 8.6%compared to the previous year. Though … Continue reading Arsenic in drinking water may increase the risk of preterm birth