10 ways to avoid toxic chemicals

Versions of this post appear in both English and Spanish languages below. The science is clear: harmful chemicals in our environment put healthy pregnancies and fetal development at risk. To help health-care professionals and their patients better understand how chemicals affect health—and what they can do about it—UCSF’s Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment … Continue reading 10 ways to avoid toxic chemicals

How climate change and air pollution affect pregnancy and human development

To recognize the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, the Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment (PRHE) has partnered with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) and the Health and Environment Alliance (HEAL) to produce a series of infographics for health professionals to communicate with their patients about the adverse impacts of climate change, … Continue reading How climate change and air pollution affect pregnancy and human development

House to EPA: Strengthening Transparency or Silencing Science?

The House Committee on Science, Space, & Technology (House Science Committee) is holding a hearing on “Strengthening Transparency or Silencing Science? The Future of Science in EPA Rulemaking.” Dr. Tracey Woodruff, Professor and Director at the University of California, San Francisco Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment, gave this statement: After EPA released its widely unpopular … Continue reading House to EPA: Strengthening Transparency or Silencing Science?

New flame retardants, old problems

Replacement flame retardants present serious risks, caution scientists New flame retardants escaping from our TVs and children’s car seats are just as toxic as the flame retardants they’re intended to replace, according to a peer-reviewed study published today in Environmental Science & Technology Letters. The authors found that the replacement chemicals, called organophosphate flame retardants, … Continue reading New flame retardants, old problems